Category Archives : Civicness


[Civics] GST petition request

This is a quick one, in case you missed it over my Twitter and Facebook: right now, the Malaysian Government is considering a list of some 800 items to be added to the list of zero-rated GST items, which means customers will not be taxed for such items.

However, pads and tampons are NOT on that list. According to this, it’s because the ministry has NOT received any official petitions/requests for such an exemption. Thus, I’m asking everyone to write to them and request that period items, aka sanitary pads, tampons and menstrual cups be zero-rated (I am not sure if the last is GST-charged, to be honest.

Sign the petition, write the emails, and help us ask the Malaysian Government to STOP TAXING our periods.


I’m Alive

It’s Merdeka Day, so let me just say:

Dataran Merdeka - Malaysia Flag, Our Pride

Negaraku
Tanah tumpahnya darahku
Rakyat hidup
Bersatu dan Maju
Rahmat bahgia
Tuhan kurniakan
Raja kita
Selamat bertakhta
Rahmat bahgia,
Tuhan kurniakan
Raja kita
Selamat bertakhta.


[Civicness] So is it in effect or not?

There are apparently two amendments made to the Evidences Act.

The first was about VA ADMISSIBILITY OF EVIDENCE OBTAINED UNDER MUTUAL ASSISTANCE IN CRIMINAL (something, probably got truncated due to Twitter’s character limits). This is the same law that was passed last year and takes effect today.

However, there is also this second amendment, which states:

if an anonymous person posts content said to be offensive on your Facebook wall, or if someone piggybacks your WiFi account and uploads a controversial document, you will be immediately deemed the publisher of the content and subject to prosecution under the relevant laws such as the Sedition Act.

The Sun originally stated that this second amendment will come into effect on June 1. However, according to Syahredzan Johan on Twitter, what comes into effect is a completely different amendment. I’ll be checking the headlines tomorrow to confirm.

That doesn’t change the fact that Nazri has said that this amendment will stay. The implementation has been stayed, but that doesn’t mean we can relax our vigilance. In fact, you should still sign the petition to stop this amendment from taking effect.


Bersih 3.0 Experience

I actually wasn’t planning on going to Bersih 3.0 yesterday. It was a very late decision made after realising I would be a horrendously big hypocrite for talking about the need for clean and fair elections without actually going for such a rally. Plus, unlike last year, I had no family obligations planned for today. (more…)


Leadup to Bersih 3.0

Bersih 3.0 is a rally calling for clean and fair elections in Malaysia. So far they have had 3 rallies. The second one was last year, and it presented 8 demands to the government:

  • Clean the electoral roll
  • Reform postal voting
  • Use of indelible ink
  • A minimum campaign period of 21 days
  • Free and fair access to mainstream media
  • Strengthen public institutions
  • Stop corruption
  • Stop dirty politics

What followed after last year’s massive rally was a Parliamentary Select Committee that was supposed to address the concerns Bersih had made. The report made it to Parliament, where they refused to allow a dissenting minority report to be entered, along with the main report. There was also no time frame stipulated to implement the recommendations.

What happened after that was far more sinister. A “stop the clock” motion was granted for the first time in years to allow Barisan Nasional, the ruling coalition with a slim majority, bulldoze 8 motions through Parliament. One of the 8 motions removes the safeguards to preventing electoral fraud and AIDS dirty politics. Here, have a read for yourself:

What this means is that the demand to clean the electoral roll wasn’t just ignored. It was brutally spat upon by the Elections Commissions. By the way, the heads of the Elections Commissions have admitted they are part of UMNO, the lead of Barisan Nasional.

And the response, as you can see in the report linked, is that “that’s not a big deal. They’re still doing their job without bias.”

Which is rather sickening when you consider that the gerrymandering and malapportionment is well and alive in Malaysia today.

Which was the reason why I marched yesterday.