Browsing Category: Musings

[Weekly Report] Stashes

Stash

I originally had a blog entry about migrating from Windows 10 32-bit to 64-bit planned, but that is kinda shot for the time being, mainly because I am too tired to write it.

That was supposed to be my weekly update on last Thursday, but as you can tell, I’m still trying to get into the swing of things. The past one month has been rather eventful, though I think I am adjusting slowly to the new arrangements.

Some quick things: I finished Doulou Dalu (by which I mean I’ve caught up to the latest chapter) and have started on Spotify’s playlist of Joseph Campbell’s lectures. It’s compelling enough that I am considering upgrading to Premium for the next 6 months to listen to the lectures, simply because if you are on free, it shuffles the playlist.

The commute to work has had the unexpected benefit of me paying more attention to my body and my period. There is definitely a correlation between my feelings of uselessness and my period. Additionally, I’m exposed to pollutants so much, I’ve actually begun wearing foundation as a way to protect my skin.

Which brings me to my next point. Some of my primary clients are in the makeup business, and so I’ve been getting more makeup stuff. The bright red Silky Girl Moisture Boost is new, as well as the Maybelline Eyeliner. The rest are stuff I’ve had for a few months now.

So let’s see how long I can continue this trend. Hopefully this will be enough for the time being and I won’t feel the itch to buy more makeup.

Weekly Update!


Pigeons playing by the pool!

Kinda late, mainly because last week was insane. This is why.

Seriously considering creating a new blog series called “NaoRenovates.” Have had two looks at the house, and yeah, it’s been a crazy Chinese New Year week.

Right now, I’ve finalised a renovation wishlist and it’s been given to a contractor for a quotation. I’m going to call HomeMark on Monday tomorrow to see if he needs to measure my house first before recommending the kitchen cabinet or if I can just drop by his office on Saturday to get his opinion.

I’ve also been looking for beds. Right now I’m looking at the Florence Genoa Elegance mattress, which comes with a very simple headboard and divan frame. It’s a bit on the high side of my budget but I like how the mattress feels.

Appliances-wise, I’m still shopping about, but it’s most likely going to be from HLK stores, simply because they seem to have the best prices and savings.

The renovation list is mainly all about the small stuff. Issue with it are simply the room sizes. You can tell it’s a family-oriented home, simply because the living room takes up the most space with the rest of the rooms being rather small.

We shall make do the best we can!

Weekly update!


What in the world is a Standard Male?

Yes, I missed last week’s report, but achievement unlocked, at least a blog post every week so far?

The past one week has been crazy.

I said goodbye to my company and will embarking on a new adventure after Chinese New Year.

I also got the keys to my house on Tuesday (WHICH IS THE PART I’M EXCITED THE MOST ABOUT, CAN YOU TELL???) and with it, all the new homeowner headaches that come with it.

Most of which I got done today.

Paid for the water to be reconnected to the house. Syabas says it’ll take 3 working days, so I’m looking to have running water by next Thursday latest at the house. Applied for the meter to be reconnected to the apartment, this will happen within 3 working days. And then also changed the name on the Cukai Taksiran aka Land Tax with MBPJ. That needs to be paid, but I think I’ll only do it tomorrow.

So yes, HOUSE!!!!!

Which brings me to a relevant tip.

If you are purchasing a home in Malaysia and the home owner has closed both the electricity (Tenaga Nasional) and water (Syabas in Selangor, not sure for other states), make multiple copies of your COMPLETED Sales and Purchase agreement (aka SnP or SPA, depending on what your lawyers use for acronyms).

You will also need copies of your NRIC (if a Malaysian citizen, not sure for foreigners, sorry!). Bring at least RM500 with you in cash, or just RM200 (for Syabas) and a credit card if you don’t want to carry so much money.

I would also recommend taking a full day off.

For Tenaga, aim to be at the Kedai Tenaga by at least 1130am. I was in the New Town branch, and there was a short queue. You can apply online for the power to be reconnected, but I found the offline application to be quite painless. Get a form, fill in, and then show it to the Customer Service Officer. You’ll be submitting the application form, a copy of your NRIC and your SnP.

Hint: if the account is closed, bring along the old account number. That way, when you submit the completed form and your SnP copy, they’ll be able to confirm and let you know the status of the power meter in your new property. Then take the number and wait till they call you.

Remember I said to bring cash or credit card? Once your number’s up, they’ll process your application and take a deposit. This will be dependent on the previous usage of your new house, so they’ll charge you a rough average. Mine was about RM250, and I opted to pay by credit card.

Once you’re done, grab a snack or head over to the 11th floor of Menara MBPJ to change the land tax to your name. You’ll need to submit just your SnP copy and complete the form. Depending on the queue, this can take anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour. Mine was done on a Friday, so it took about 20 minutes, mainly because they had to look up the name of the property.

It’ll be about time to break for lunch, so go and have something to eat before you get into the car. Aim to be at Syabas by 3.30pm latest (I went to Jalan Templer). This is where it gets tedious; you’ll need to get a form from the counter, fill it up (and they ask a LOT of questions in that form) and then submit it with your SnP and NRIC copy to the customer service counter. They’ll ask for a witness to sign your document; just ask any customer there to sign for you. They usually will.

The first submission stage is where Syabas’ process annoyed me. The first customer service person flipped through my documents to make sure all the sections were filled, and then asked me to take a seat; her colleague would process the documents first. This was a twenty minute wait as there were a lot of people before me; it seemed that what she was doing (the second colleague) was simply removing the irrelevant sections of the form, double checking my details, and then RESTAPLING everything.

Really though, did you really need two copies of everything Syabas, and did you really need to have the customer service person do that when the counter person could? No wonder Syabas loses so much money; this process could have been streamlined in so many ways without incurring as much wastage!

Oh yeah, once she calls out for your number, take it and have seat. This part took about ten minutes; when my number was up, I submitted the document and then paid the deposit, which was only in cash (this is why they have an ATM on the premises). Then I had to wait for them to complete the stamping procedure.

By this time, it was already 4.45 pm, and the doors were closed (Syabas closes at 4.30pm, so you will want to be INSIDE the building before then). Once you’ve collected your stamped copy, you’re good to go. Water services will resume 3 working days after you’ve done everything.

With that, congratulations, you’ve just completed the pre-renovation stage!

Small Blessings

Recently one of my friends asked me how I stayed motivated, beyond the usual drive of routine and necessity (aka I need cash to survive).

Before that, I had another friend asked me how I stayed kind.

I remember babbling on, but I think what helps is being grateful.

I take comfort from small blessings, from the little things that happened throughout the day. I am also learning to let go of “what other people might think about me feeling this way” which is far harder than it sounds.

I make it a point to say “Thank you” to almost everyone I meet (the habit of saying “I’m sorry” when something bad happens is the opposite and is something I’m trying to break).

Shugo the White Seal with a pair of sunglasses on his face
Seeking joy in the little things, like Shugo on top of my head

I find joy in smiling every day. Wearing a mask because of my allergies makes this even easier, because no one can see you smile like a crazy person when the appropriate thought flashes by,

These are all surface habits though. Small things. But they help me make sense of the day, of the moment, of the pain.

Once I became aware and grateful for the little things, it became a habit. And habits are second nature; you will usually find yourself doing things over and over again by routine or by trigger. And they build on each other.

I found an unexpected benefit in this habit. It made me reexamine my own behaviour, my own biases and friendships. The latter is especially important, as I have a tendency to defend my friends blindly.

I am a hoarder. This translates to both physical possessions and intangible ties. There’s a good chance that unless I need to use/contact often, I will forget some things exist. But I’m trying.

Trying to keep alive the friendships that mean a lot to me. To pull away from the things and people that drain me. To find time for myself and genuinely reflect.

Having someone who plays the devil’s advocate and makes me feel uncomfortable in terms of my thinking is an unexpected blessing.

I’m learning, slowly but surely, to let go. To be in this reality and this moment. And the practicalities associated with it.

Like buying a house. Moving out of my comfort zone. Pushing my words out to be published. Making earning money a priority and not think about it as a dirty thing.

I’m still trying.

[NaoReviews] Made in Malaysia

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Title: Made in Malaysia: Stories of Hometown Heroes and Hidden Gems
Author: Alexandra Wong
Price: Generally around RM32.90
Rating: 4.5 out of 5
TL;DR: Take a moment to breathe and smile.

Disclaimer: I know the author personally but she did not ask me to write this review.

The thing about picking up non-fiction Malaysian books is that I often have very little faith in their content. I am also uncomfortable with the vast majority of them, if only because they seem to be mainly feel good or deliberately inflammatory.

So I was a little jaded, perhaps, when Made in Malaysia reached my hands. And as it turned out, this was what I needed.

From tales of getting lost and finding friendly faces, to talks with a train driver to a magical Sarawak visit, Alex imbues her stories with curiosity and wonder. You’ll probably find yourself giggling and laughing as you read them.

What really struck me though, was the quiet dignity and respect she treats her interviewees with.

There’s Lipu, the Lady of the Longhouse who inspires. There’s impromptu interviews with bus ticket collectors and taxi drivers, who exhibit their own quiet pride in their occupation. Then there’s the one about the railway driver, Azmi who gives her one of the best pieces of advice to have in life.

And there’s the one called “She’s all heart.”

This is the story that touched me the most. That still moves me to tears even after all this while.

It is, in my opinion, the most important story in the book.

Not just because I believe in organ donation.

Not just because I think Dr Lela’s story should be told.

But because the way Alex tells Dr Lela’s story pays tribute to the grieving families who choose to donate their loved ones’ body so someone else could live. They are not nameless corpses who may have passed on in accidents, but human beings who were loved, adored, and cared while they were alive.

And thanks to their donations, other families can continue to enjoy the same.

You could, I suppose, read most of her stories online (a large majority of the stories in this book WAS taken from her Navel Gazer column).

I think though, that it would be better to buy the book. As a reminder of what being a human and perhaps secondarily, a Malaysian, is all about.

Who knows? You might discover your own Hometown Hero.