Despite what some people might say about the franchise needing to die, this kinda sums up for me why I think that Star Trek SHOULD continue (emphasis mine):

Do you think that the original TV show, with its Cold War and UN parallels, and its US segregation/Civil Rights allusions (i.e. first interracial kiss on TV) has outlived its relevance in today’s more modern, and accepting society and therefore was harder to reference in the movie, if at all? Zidel333

J.J. Abrams: Star Trek came out at a time when there was the Vietnam War, the Cold War, fear of Russians, and a lot of racial and social upheaval. The show depicted a vision of our future that was optimistic, embracing of all cultures and people, and was remarkable if not just for its lack of cynicism. It was canceled after 3 seasons though. It didn’t work really until later when it was on syndication. I think that the idea of the first interracial kiss, the idea of having a Russian on board or someone of African or Asian descent is certainly not remotely as shocking now as it might have been back then. I think what is relevant is the need for people to be reminded that collaboration… that working together disregarding social, religious, political, racial boundaries is the only way we’re going to survive. I feel that this is a message that is as relevant today as it was almost fifty years ago, which in one way might be tragic. But on the other hand, I think that it’s a relief to see and certainly to have worked on a movie that is embracing of that optimism and depicting a vision of our future unlike Star Wars (a long time ago in a galaxy far far away). Star Trek is us. That thought and that optimism is as valuable today as it was when Gene Roddenbery first created the show.

Thank you, JJ Abrams.